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Why universities are switching to R for teaching social science

Why universities are switching to R for teaching social science

Higher education institutions traditionally used SPSS when teaching social science. But there’s a shift toward R; a programming language and free software environment for statistical computing and graphics. Find out the top reasons why your institution should switch to R.

What is social data science and how is it done?

What is social data science and how is it done?

What is social data science and how is it done? Taha Yasseri, course instructor on the SAGE Campus Research Design in Social Data Science online course, explains the big data-driven approach to social science research that everyone is talking about.

What computational social science helped me achieve

What computational social science helped me achieve

The ability to work with digital research methods and data analysis is opening up a whole new world of research potential for social scientists. Dr. James Allen-Robertson, Digital Sociologist at the University of Essex, tells us how computational social science has given him and his research output a new lease of life.

My experience learning Python

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My experience learning Python

Learning Python can be daunting for social scientists who don’t have a technical background. Dmitrijs Martinovs, assistant at SAGE Campus, tells us his experience of switching from SPSS to Python to better conduct analyses when undertaking a research masters in social policy.

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Top 10 tips for teaching tricky topics online

Top 10 tips for teaching tricky topics online

Online learning done well can remove barriers to learning by offering flexible ways to learn new skills, whenever you want and wherever you are. But creating effective online learning isn’t easy and the challenges are especially pronounced when teaching complex and advanced topics. Read our top tips for designing effective online learning based on our experience of developing SAGE Campus courses.

What is a Jupyter Notebook?

What is a Jupyter Notebook?

A fantastic benefit of the course Introduction to Data Science for Social Scientists is that it introduces you to using Jupyter Notebooks, part of the Jupyter Project. But what is Jupyter? And why is it such a useful tool? We asked course instructor Geoff Bacon to share his thoughts.

Inside SAGE Campus: The eLearning advisory board

Inside SAGE Campus: The eLearning advisory board

At SAGE Campus we’re passionate about providing a learning journey that is successful from start to finish. To ensure that our courses are pedagogically effective and provide an engaging learning experience, we work with an eLearning Advisory Board.  Read about how the expert feedback we receive is woven throughout the creation of our courses. 

Data visualisation: labelling

Data visualisation: labelling

Find out how to make clever choices about label placement, and how labels that appear to be simple, can actually make visualisations confusing.  

Data visualisation: Use of colour

Data visualisation: Use of colour

This blog post is the first in a series of pieces by Andy Kirk, on the 'little’ of visualisation design: the small decisions that make a big difference towards the good and bad of visualisation. This week’s post discusses use of colour.

Why are Social Scientists choosing Python?

Why are Social Scientists choosing Python?

Python is one of the most popular programming languages in the data science world, but it is also proving integral to the burgeoning field of computational social science. Find out what attracts social scientists to Python.

The importance of cleaning your data

The importance of cleaning your data

In this blog post Dr Chris Hench, course instructor on Introduction to Data Science for Social Scientists, discusses how to clean your data and why it’s important that you do so.

Where should I start - R or Python?

Where should I start - R or Python?

If you conduct social science research and you are using Stata, SAS, or SPSS, you might be looking to learn how to use some of the new tools on the block. R and Python are the two popular programming languages used by data analysts and although you could learn both, that would require a significant time investment. So which should you start with? And which one is best for social scientists?