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Python

My experience learning Python

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My experience learning Python

Learning Python can be daunting for social scientists who don’t have a technical background. Dmitrijs Martinovs, assistant at SAGE Campus, tells us his experience of switching from SPSS to Python to better conduct analyses when undertaking a research masters in social policy.

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Webinar: Introduction to Python

Webinar: Introduction to Python

Do you want to learn more about how Python can be used for working with social data? Watch our webinar with SAGE Campus course instructor, Rob Mastrodomenico and find out all you need to know.

Where should I start - R or Python?

Where should I start - R or Python?

If you conduct social science research and you are using Stata, SAS, or SPSS, you might be looking to learn how to use some of the new tools on the block. R and Python are the two popular programming languages used by data analysts and although you could learn both, that would require a significant time investment. So which should you start with? And which one is best for social scientists?

Take 5 with Phillip Brooker

Take 5 with Phillip Brooker

Phillip Brooker is an interdisciplinary researcher in the field of social media analytics, with a background in sociology and sociological research methods. Phillip co-convenes the Programming-as-Social-Science (PaSS) network (www.jiscmail.ac.uk/PaSS) which explores computer programming as a subject and methodological tool for social research and teaching. Phillip is also our social science expert and course instructor on Introduction to Python for Social Scientists. We spoke to him about his background in computational social science and what he’s been working on recently.

Top tips for using data science in social science research

Top tips for using data science in social science research

We asked Phillip Brooker, an interdisciplinary researcher in the field of social media analytics, and social science expert on Introduction to Python for Social Scientists, for his advice on using data science methods in social science research. 

Phillip has background in sociology and sociological research methods, and co-convenes the Programming-as-Social-Science (PaSS) network which explores computer programming as a subject and methodological tool for social research and teaching. So if you’re looking into computational social science, listen up, you’re in good hands!